OpenRent Community

Tenant Fines and prosecutions

There are a number of laws which threaten the landlord resulting in heavy fines and prosecution. Eg- Gas Safety. EICR, ECP, etc. Does the tenant share any legal responsibility for their home?

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blood out of a stone

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They would be liable for health and safety breaches and you can sue them for damages or rent arrears. Not sure what you had in mind.

I didn’t really have anything in mind, I just keep reading a never ending list of landlord’s legal obligations, and find it difficult to keep up.

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Well, that’s because it won’t stop until all LLs have sold up, that’s the government’s goal irrespective of colour.

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The joys of letting…!

The answer to your original question, is quite simply NO!, other than what David noted.

They don’t even have to pay the costs of a reference to prove THEIR suitability to rent. Try that with a mortgage or bank loan…

As a landlord you have the responsibility to provide a property which has all the requisite safety certs and tests and to maintain the safe structure of the building and outbuildings which are with the house when it is rented. This includes windows, fireplaces, plumbing etc. and even large trees which may cause damage to a person or property including your own. The tenant must pay you on time, maintain the garden as specified in the lease (usually keep the lawns cut and maintain flower beds, keep drive and walkways free of ice) unless you offer the garden maintenance as part of the lease. They must also maintain the inside by keeping it clean, pest free, repair any damage done by them from hanging pictures etc, and generally keep the property in the same condition it was in when you let it to them. An example of this is painting. So if you painted the interior prior to the tenancy, they leave in a year, they should paint as needed.

Or more to do with that most landlords don’t care about things such as safety and would have their tenants living in absolute squalor if the law allowed it.

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They don’t even have to pay the costs of a reference to prove THEIR suitability to rent. Try that with a mortgage or bank loan…

God forbid that landlords have to pay an insignificant fee to allow someone to pay THEIR mortgage. I’m sure if tenants had a choice, they’d chose a mortgage over dealing with a landlord any day of the year.

Definitely not. If that’s your situation, I’m very sorry.

some tenants live like pigs with their animals … Even if the house started off clean I have worked as a builder in Landlord s properties. The squalor comes from the tenants. clothes all over the place , dishes unwashed. don t know what a hoover is… Smells of dog

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I care about my tenants well being

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Those landlords you speak of are mostly the local authorities! I’m a private renter and it’s disgusting the amount of legislation placed in private LL! Don’t getmr wrong it does demand a level of legislation but it should be for ALL housing! The state of local authority housing and those owned by large housing associations are disgraceful and unfit for human habitation because they are not included in the legislation set out for private landlords and it’s disgusting and there needs to be legitimate put on tenants that are receiving rent from the government in mediums such as Universal credit! It should be classed and treated as fraud when a tenant spreads ring fenced money on anything other than rent! I’m a private tenant yet I’m suffering due to the lack of legislation put on tenants! A £500 bond is not going to pay for a destroyed kitchen or replastering of walls either! It’s a very unbalanced sector yet it is a sector that is needed as much as energy and water everyone needs to drink it and everyone needs a roof over their head but it’s only the private sector that is keeping I’d say at least 50% from being homeless (not including mortgage population).
More needs to be done to help private landlords not penalise them!

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spot on Julie 1 . Large housing associations can get away with unfit properties as they do not come under the same rules as private landlords… I bought a big place off a H A not in bad condition, reported a bad overflow on their place next door, took 4 months to fix and their wall was soaking. Collapsed wall took 2 years for them to repair. Reported their tenant was dealing drugs , it took them18 months to get rid of him

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Exactly it’s outrageous!! I’m sick and tired of seeing campaigns by shelter screaming for more legislation when it should be campaigns to protect landlords from tenants that purposely damage property or just neglect it beyond repair but my biggest issue that infuriates me most is the damage that is being done by the government allowing tenants to use ring fenced money for rent and offers no recourse for landlords who are owed millions up and down the country! It’s behaviour like this that stops those people like myself who have zero options due to disability to get public money to help rent because landlords just can’t afford to take the risk and I don’t blame them!! Constantly communicating this to my local MP because this unbalanced sector can’t be allowed to continue for ALL our sakes!
Apologies for the rant but it really infuriates me.

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ironically… these Housing associations are owed at least 100 million. in rent!! Stupid . …their repairs are at a backlog and they have more empty properties than ever before ., Crazy

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Well said. Totally agree every word.

Yes they may be owed hundreds of thousands. However who is the rent owed to? It’s a machine made up of many individuals just mechanically inputting data and sending computer generated letter so no personal impact at the amount of unpaid rent unlike the private LL’s. But even then that should not make them exempt from the legislation that the government places on the private sector.
Why is a private tenant given so many rights to live in almost perfect condition and protected by so much legislation in comparison to a council tenant living in squalor?

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It’s hardly insignificant when you add in an agents fees, costs to cover safety checks and legislative / legal requirements, which tenants are no longer required / allowed by law to contribute towards. It’s a 2-way agreement of mutual benefit and, as such, should be a shared expense.

Renting some ones privately owned property is a privilege, not a right, and considering the investment, risks and legislative / legal constraints we’re required to endure, I would say it’s a rather large privilege! Hugely beneficial to the tenant and an easy life in terms of acquiring accommodation for your self, providing you are a suitable and eligible candidate to rent.

Some people choose to rent out of preference, not always necessity, as it’s an easy life, without the responsibilities / commitments of property ownership and maintenance.

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Pigs might fly!

You’ve about as much chance of enforcing that requirement through the courts or the deposit organisations, as flying to the moon. Their fair wear & tear policies will not agree to that remedial work being required, since they estimate a 5-7 year cycle of renewal is required to be undertaken by the landlord. As if we are running a b…y hotel… Wish I could charge hotel rates / night!

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